January Day 2015

 
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2015
Thursday, January 8th
8:29 AM

Overview of January Day 2015

Framingham State University

McCarthy College Center and Hemenway Hall, Framingham State University

8:29 AM - 2:00 PM

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8:30 AM

Continental Breakfast

Framingham State University

Forum

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

9:00 AM

Welcoming Remarks

Claudia Springer, Framingham State University
Linda Vaden-Goad, Framingham State University

Forum, McCarthy College Center

9:00 AM - 9:15 AM

9:30 AM

Into the Digital Wilds: The Pros and Cons of Integrating Mobile Media Devices into Traditional Course Teaching and Student Communication

Jennifer Coleman Dowling, Framingham State University
Robert Johnson Jr., Framingham State University
Christopher J. Bowen, Framingham State University

MC 415

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Student use of mobile digital technologies and the Internet is an omnipresent reality on today's campuses, yet faculty often seem to be behind the curve. This session will explore several Teaching with Technology experiments where mobile media devices have been innovatively injected into traditional course instruction, assignments and student workflow. The products of and reactions to this curriculum will be shared. Additionally, how can faculty work towards establishing their own effective digital presence? Tools, apps, and methods for student connectivity and interaction, productivity, class management, and communication will be discussed. Attendees' experiences in the digital wilds will be welcomed.

Managing the Paper Load: Commenting on Student Writing Without Giving Yourself Carpal Tunnel

Patricia Lynne, Framingham State University

MC 417

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Many of the concepts and practices that we want our students to learn would be well served by writing assignments, but without formal training in grammar and with an already full workload, how can teachers add a(nother) set of papers to our grading piles? Drawing on research in the field of composition studies, as well as nearly two decades of experience teaching writing courses, I will provide concrete practices applicable to all disciplines for commenting on and grading written student work—without retraining as grammarians and without giving up entire weekends for paper grading.

Moving Beyond Survival: Implementing Habits of Mind for Student Research

Deborah McMakin, Framingham State University

Alumni Room

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Helping students recognize and appreciate the critical thinking and communication skills involved in completing research projects can be difficult, especially when students are intimidated by the course content. Students may approach the research process with an emphasis on survival and overlook opportunities for intellectual and personal growth. I will describe how I have utilized ideas put forth in the book Habits of Mind (e.g., metacognition, persistence) in research methods courses to help students recognize and use the intelligent behaviors necessary to navigate the research process. Instructor and students' perspectives on the benefits and challenges of utilizing Habits of Mind will be discussed.

The Rising Cost of Textbooks—Is There an Answer?

Millie Gonzalez, Framingham State University
Robin Robinson, Framingham State University
Ben Atchison, Framingham State University

MC 419

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM

If you share concerns about the high cost of college textbooks, find it difficult to locate appropriate course materials at an affordable price, and are curious about new sources of course content to engage students, attend this session to learn about open educational resources (OER). OER are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some licenses to re-mix, improve, and redistribute.

10:30 AM

Break

Framingham State University

McCarthy College Center and Hemenway Hall, Framingham State University

10:30 AM - 10:45 AM

10:45 AM

Effective Advising for Student Success

Christopher Gregory, Framingham State University
Aline Davis, Framingham State University

MC 419

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

What is your academic advising approach: prescriptive? developmental? proactive? appreciative? The presenters will help you step back from seeing advising as just those crazy two months of meeting with students before registration, and we will prompt you to reflect on the type of advisor you are—and who you want to be for the good of your advisees—all year round. The co-presenters will share their advising experiences and offer suggestions, and the interactive session will feature ample time for discussion of challenges and successes from participants. Join us!

Promote Student Engagement Using Blackboard Tools

Robin S. Robinson, Framingham State University
Stacy Cohen, Framingham State University
Dan Facchinetti, Framingham State University
Justin Lauzon, Framingham State University

MC 417

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Significant learning experiences occur when students are engaged in the course content. This hands-on session is an opportunity to expand your use of Blackboard, ask questions of the experts, and hear how to extend the tool to improve what happens in and out of the classroom. Learn how to organize your course and integrate new Blackboard tools and functionality into your teaching and create an interactive learning environment that aligns with your teaching style and engages your students. This session is designed as a hands-on workshop. Bring your laptop to this session.

Teaching First-Year Students

Elaine V. Beilin, Framingham State University
Ben Trapanick, Framingham State University

MC 415

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

In spring 2015, CELTSS will sponsor a series of three workshops on Teaching First-Year Students. Particularly relevant to faculty teaching in the First-Year Foundations program, these workshops are open to all faculty who are interested in the specialized skills and teaching strategies that improve first-year students' learning and help them to succeed academically. In this session, we will provide an overview of the workshops, introduce some of the research and best practices related to teaching first-year students, and work with participants on some assignments and activities that engage beginning college students.

Towards Transgender Inclusivity: How and Why to Ask About Preferred Pronouns

Virginia Rutter, Framingham State University
Lisa Eck, Framingham State University
James Cressey, Framingham State University
Kimmi Awiszio, Framingham State University
FSU Pride Alliance

1839 Room, McCarthy College Center

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

FSU Pride Alliance and Academic Affairs have encouraged faculty to learn students' preferred personal pronouns at the beginning of the semester. In this session we share strategies for how to do this and stories about benefits to the entire class and community. We will also discuss gender non-normativity, gender fluidity, and sexual fluidity. You will leave the session with strategies for how to engage all students regarding preferred personal pronouns.

11:45 AM

Lunch

Framingham State University

Forum

11:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Take this opportunity to discuss successful teaching and advising methods with your colleagues.

1:00 PM

Advising Students on Career Preparation in Newly Comprehensive Schools

Francis Kemegue, Framingham State University

MC 417

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Liberal arts schools transitioning to comprehensive colleges often face growing requests from students and parents to get career outcomes (from relatively expensive educations with ballooning school loans) clearly articulated to them as early as when they initially shop for schools. This becomes an issue for faculty members because specialized career preparation and job placement often fall beyond the traditional role of career services in a liberal arts environment. Departments sometimes adjust to students' and parents' requests for better education outcomes by articulating a simplified degree completion framework, or by considering inclusion of career preparation, internships and co-ops to their programs. This presentation will explore the possibilities and challenges of adapting student advising to better address the career-preparation needs of business students as an example of attempts to deal with this growing educational challenge.

Engaging Student Imagination as a Learning Tool in Empirical Disciplines

Stefan Papaioannou, Framingham State University
Jesse Marcum, Framingham State University

MC 415

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Across a wide range of disciplines, instructors emphasize to students the importance of objectivity and factual information as means of uncovering truth. Yet, practitioners of these disciplines know that imagination—often superficially associated with unreality—is crucial for interpreting information insightfully and for generating solutions to problems. To help enrich our students' experience and deepen their understanding of "fact-based" disciplines, we have developed assignments in fields as diverse as history and chemistry that explicitly encourage students to employ their imaginations. Beyond serving as valuable learning vehicles, these assignments provide instructors with unique windows into the minds of students.

Sharing Best Practices for Online and Blended Learning Courses

T. Bridgett Galvin, Framingham State University
Dan Facchinetti, Framingham State University
Robin S. Robinson, Framingham State University

MC 419

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

There are many factors that affect a student's experience in an online course, including course design, course delivery, course content, technology, institutional infrastructure, faculty readiness for online teaching, and student readiness for online learning and support. Join your colleagues in sharing ideas and methods that work in aligning course design with learning outcomes, objectives, and assignments using the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric.

Using MATLAB in the Classroom for Fun and (Academic) Profit

Larry McKenna
Doug Leaffer, Framingham State University

Hemenway 208

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

MATLAB is a powerful data analysis and visualization package now provided free to every student and faculty member at FSU. Developed by MathWorks (just down Route 9 from our campus), the software is flexible, user-friendly, and the industry-standard way of analyzing data. The power of MATLAB lies in the ability to quickly, accurately, and easily analyze data and display the results professionally. Analyses are easily customized, and best of all, you can save your work so that subsequent analyses are automated, available with a few keystrokes. We'll start with a few basics and then go on to analyze and display data. Then we'll learn the power of scripts, publishing, and the m-file, which your students can email to you to document their work and results. A single click runs all their work, so you can assess their accomplishments quickly and efficiently.