Document Type

Book Review

Publication Date

2001

DOI

10.1080/00438240120079244

Version

Pre-print

Publication Title

World Archaeology

Abstract

In the figurative art of Late Bronze Age Knossos one recognizes a singular form to the human body which cuts across all other distinctions. Contrary to popular and academic interpretations, sexed differences are not marked in a clearly binary fashion. Drawing on this observation, the current paper analyses the relationship between two sets of figurines from the Bronze Age Palace site of Knossos: the faience figurines from the 'Temple Repositories' and the ivory bull-leaper figurines from the 'Domestic Quarter'. The interpretation of these figurines elucidates: a) how the appearance of sexual characteristics is context specific and not a general feature of the imagery; and b) the differing aesthetic responses motivated by and surrounding these two sets of artefacts and hence the social contexts in which representations of sexed differences were mobilized.

Comments

Copyright 2001, Taylor & Francis. This is the author's pre-print of an article available in its final, edited form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00438240120079244.

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