•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Participants were 61 college students, emolled in three social science courses. Baseline measures of attitudes towards homosexuals and homophobia were taken during a pre-test session. Approximately one month later, the classrooms were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Students in the control group viewed a videotape on gender and participated in a general discussion on gender issues. Students in experimental group l viewed a videotape on myths about homosexuality with a discussion on homosexuality with a self-identified heterosexual. Students in experimental group 2 viewed the same videotape on myths about homosexuality with a discussion on homosexuality with a self-identified homosexual. The attitude measures were readministered following discussions. Results showed positive changes in attitudes toward homosexuals and homophobia from pre- to post-test. Response patterns also supported expected gender and prior contact differences in attitude. The value of even brief positive exposure to homosexuals is discussed.

Share

COinS