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Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior

Book Title

Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior

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Publication Date

9-27-2010

Start Page

237

Editors

Michael D. Breed, Janice Moore

Chapter Title

Kin Recognition and Genetics

Edition

1

Publisher

Academic Press, Elsevier

Place of Publication

Boston

Keywords

animal behavior, genetics, nepotism, kin

Subject

Animal behavior, genetics

Department

Biology

Disciplines

Biology | Ecology and Evolutionary Biology | Genetics and Genomics

Description

The Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior has engaged-with great success-the efforts of many of the best behavioral biologists of the 21st century. Section editors drawn from the most accomplished behavioral scientists of their generation have enrolled an international cast of highly respected thinkers and writers-all of whom have taken great care and joy in illuminating every imaginable corner of animal behavior. This comprehensive work covers not only the usual topics such as communication, learning, sexual selection, navigation, and the history of the field, but also emerging topics in cognition, animal welfare, conservation, and applications of animal behavior. The large section on animal cognition brings together many of the world's experts on the subject to provide a comprehensive overview of this rapidly developing area. Chapters relating to animal welfare give a full view of behavioral interactions of humans with companion animals, farm animals, and animals in the wild. The key role of animal behavior in conservation biology receives broad attention, including chapters on topics such as the effects of noise pollution, captive breeding, and how the behavioral effects of parasites interacts with conservation issues. Animal behavior in environmental biology is highlighted in chapters on the effects of endocrine disruptors on behavior and a large number of chapters on key species, such as wolves, chimpanzees, hyenas and sharks.

Comments

Chapter abstract: Nonreciprocal altruism makes evolutionary sense only when directed toward close relatives. As such, many if not all organisms that engage in altruistic behaviors also possess mechanisms for kin discrimination. While some of these organisms rely exclusively on contextual clues (e.g., presence in nest) to determine kinship, others learn to associate particular phenotypic traits with relatedness. Still others assess genotypic identity via phenotypic cues and target cooperative care only to individuals that possess specific alleles. The degree to which genetic information is involved in the recognition process is therefore variable across systems and represents an intriguing topic for behavioral research.

ISBN

9780080453354

Document Type

Article

Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior

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